The Classicist

62 notes

It's Nice That : Art: Lernert & Sander return knitted designer clothes to balls of wool

aristoteliancomplacency:

So… This is the kind of thing I have mixed and complicated feelings about.

I’m not going to say “that isn’t art” because my position is that art is in the eye of the beholder.

But I *will* say that this is something that hundreds and thousands of knitters and crocheters the world over do ALL THE TIME. It’s called frogging. It’s just efficient. You find something that’s not going to be used or worn, but where the yarn is still reasonably undamaged and you frog it. You store the yarn for a future project.

Like I said, I’m not going to claim this isn’t art, but what I don’t understand is why it gets acknowledged as art when two white men do it in a gallery-space, and not when hundreds and thousands of (mainly) women do it every single day in their own home.

If Lernert and Sander are unaware that this is common practice amongst yarn-based crafters then their research is piss-poor and they should do better. If they did know, and just chose not to acknowledge their indebtedness then they’re just appropriative assholes.

Yes, frogging finished items is a beautiful thing and it’s art, but it was art already when everyone in the yarn-based craft community did it. These two men doing it doesn’t magically make it art when it wasn’t before.

I feel this is the sort of thing that they should have written an ‘academic’ (whatever that means) article about, acknowledging the actual community engaged in this practice and then discussing what makes it such a beautiful phenomenon, rather than just plagiarising a community’s common practice and getting praised for it because ‘omg, men working with a material stupidly designated by society as being for women, HOW AMAZING.’

I also have issues with this relating to necessity/thrift/class/wealth, but I cannot brain well enough to articulate those right now. But there’s definitely something insidious about taking a practice based on reusing and saving money and ‘making do’ and importing it into the corpulent, lucre-obsessed art world. And the act of importing it devalues the concept/practice in the same way private collectors devalue the work when they rip a Banksy piece of a wall and store it in their private galleries.

0 notes

Bristol-based art-academia-community group MakingLearning are producing a series of patchwork poems - each patch contains a word, and is made by a different person. I just did the piecing and the quilting. 

MakingLearning may be Bristol (uk) based, but for the patchwork poem project we’ve received patches from lots of different places - not just other places in the UK, but also from other countries in Europe, and other continents. So if you think this is something you’d like to participate in, please don’t think distance is a barrier! Get in touch, and we’ll post a patch out to you.

MakingLearning has a Facebook page, which you should totally check out: https://m.facebook.com/makinglearning

Bristol-based art-academia-community group MakingLearning are producing a series of patchwork poems - each patch contains a word, and is made by a different person. I just did the piecing and the quilting.

MakingLearning may be Bristol (uk) based, but for the patchwork poem project we’ve received patches from lots of different places - not just other places in the UK, but also from other countries in Europe, and other continents. So if you think this is something you’d like to participate in, please don’t think distance is a barrier! Get in touch, and we’ll post a patch out to you.

MakingLearning has a Facebook page, which you should totally check out: https://m.facebook.com/makinglearning

Filed under art craft quilting patchwork poetry MakingLearning

13 notes

Stitch play. Originally I was just intending to try out the thread itself, to see what stitches the variegation would work well with, and then I just ended up playing with stitch ideas I’d had in my head for a while. Unfortunately, this thread wasn’t really the best for some of the chain stitch variations, so I’ll probably do those again on another sampler.

Stitch play. Originally I was just intending to try out the thread itself, to see what stitches the variegation would work well with, and then I just ended up playing with stitch ideas I’d had in my head for a while. Unfortunately, this thread wasn’t really the best for some of the chain stitch variations, so I’ll probably do those again on another sampler.

Filed under sewing embroidery sampler craft

2 notes

On Tuesday night I stayed up all night working on complex quilt pattern of geometric design as a leaving present for someone whose final day was Wednesday. At 5.00am I realised I wasn’t going to finish it, so I put it aside and made this one. Little sleep was had that night. Her leaving party started at 3.30pm, and that’s about the same time in the morning I eventually got home. On Thursday basically all I did was sleep.

On Tuesday night I stayed up all night working on complex quilt pattern of geometric design as a leaving present for someone whose final day was Wednesday. At 5.00am I realised I wasn’t going to finish it, so I put it aside and made this one. Little sleep was had that night. Her leaving party started at 3.30pm, and that’s about the same time in the morning I eventually got home. On Thursday basically all I did was sleep.

Filed under quilting patchwork craft

36 notes

More geometric play.

The symmetry isn’t perfect, but given the amount of tension points, I’m happy with it.

The stitches used here are all really basic - twisted satin, buttonhole, vandyke, lazy daisy, whipped wheel.

The complexity comes from how they interact with and tension each other (e.g the vandyke stitch will loop around the cross junction of two button hole stitches, and pull them into a new positions (and then you have to try and get exactly the same tension another 9 times).

I don’t know if there’s an official name for this type of embroidery. I have a lot of stitch dictionaries and collections, and I’ve never seen anything like this in any of my books.

If no one else knows of a pre-existing name for it, I’mma have to invent one.

Maybe… Arachne work. <_>

Filed under embroidery geometry art craft maths sewing arachne work artists on tumblr

59 notes

Small relaxation project from last night.

Lots of detached chain stitch, buttonhole variant, a whipped woven wheel (or double whipped, I wrapped around the two strands of the chain stitch spokes separately) and Ceylon stitch in the middle.

It was more an experiment in shape and design than stitch techniques. As you may be able to tell, I&#8217;m rediscovering my love for geometry.

Small relaxation project from last night.

Lots of detached chain stitch, buttonhole variant, a whipped woven wheel (or double whipped, I wrapped around the two strands of the chain stitch spokes separately) and Ceylon stitch in the middle.

It was more an experiment in shape and design than stitch techniques. As you may be able to tell, I’m rediscovering my love for geometry.

Filed under craft art geometry sewing embroidery

6 notes

Geometry is a beautiful thing.

This was my mini-relaxation project last night, and a test piece for some quilt designs. Pretty annoyed at how wonky a couple of the lines are, but that was a mix of: canvas distortion due to embroidery hoop when drawing the lines in the first place, and my fabric pen being too erasable. By the time I got around to the last lines the marks were pretty much gone.

I think the next step would be to set up the fabric on a square frame and prick the design instead. Or maybe I should just hand-sew it, instead?

Geometry is a beautiful thing.

This was my mini-relaxation project last night, and a test piece for some quilt designs. Pretty annoyed at how wonky a couple of the lines are, but that was a mix of: canvas distortion due to embroidery hoop when drawing the lines in the first place, and my fabric pen being too erasable. By the time I got around to the last lines the marks were pretty much gone.

I think the next step would be to set up the fabric on a square frame and prick the design instead. Or maybe I should just hand-sew it, instead?

Filed under geometry sewing craft maths

33,968 notes

In some older versions of Persephone’s story, she was a young woman, not a young girl, and instead of accidentally wandering away, she had gone deliberately adventuring, when she fell, or was lured, or was kidnapped into Hell. Here Persephone’s adventurous spirit leads her into difficulty, instead of her being a passive victim of the wickedness of others. Her relationship with her mother gives her the courage to explore her world, and when events take a bad turn, their relationship gives her the strength to survive.

In a still older version, Persephone heard the despairing cries of the dead and chose freely to go into the Underworld to comfort them. Hades does not appear at all, in this version. Here Persephone’s descent to hell illustrates inclusiveness for every being, whether in the Underworld or in our present one, and shows that mercy is integral to her nature.

In the most ancient layer of myth, Persephone’s name means “She Who Destroys The Light.” She was the powerful Goddess of the Underworld long before anyone knew of Hades. Like the Indian Kali, the Irish Morrigan, and the Sumerian Ereshkegal, she was the Goddess of Death.

(x)

Citation needed.

Persephone is kinda outside my specialisations, but I have never seen any reputable academic source mention most of this. And the lack of references or links to sources makes me pretty sure this is big steamy piles of bs.

And there’s genuinely interesting and awesome stuff about Persephone that’s not even included. Which, again, makes me doubt that any actual research has been done.

(Source: auntiewitch, via zemmer)

Filed under persephone classics citation needed